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Who are the indigenous Chamorros

Who are the indigenous Chamorros

Fred (View posts)
Posted: 8 Apr 2001 8:56PM GMT
Does anybody out there really believe that the word Chamorro is rooted in and indigenous to Guam?

(Many) Guamanians honestly believe this to be fact beyond the shadow of doubt. I do not...and I am Guamanian.

Chamorros

Posted: 19 Apr 2001 4:07PM GMT
Edited: 9 Jul 2001 6:27PM GMT
If the Chamorros are not indigenous to Guam, then where else? What is your source of information? You certainly must have some definite information from which you have drawn this conclusion!

Indigenous Chamorros

Sally (View posts)
Posted: 23 Apr 2001 9:39PM GMT
I firmly believe the origin of the word Chamorro is Spain via Cuba, South and Central America. Magellan brought the name to Guam. Chamorro is a surname common to Central America especially in Nicaragua.

Indigenous Chamorros

Fred (View posts)
Posted: 23 Apr 2001 9:42PM GMT
Sorry for the previous posting...it was meant to be Fred (to Sally) as the submittor.

Chamorro

Posted: 25 Apr 2001 2:04PM GMT
Edited: 9 Jul 2001 6:27PM GMT
Fred -

What we're talking about here is a name and/or topic that has been passed down through several thousand years without the benefit of a "written" language. I'm just now getting into the search for information concerning the origin of the ancient peoples of Guam. What I'm finding are more questions rather than any answers. For now, I have to believe that we need to just accept some of these beliefs because none of us can really prove that one belief is true and another is false. I think I understand why you believe the way you do, and you are certainly entitled to feel that way about the word "Chomorro." I do agree with you that it is a surname in some places in the world. Most search engines on the Internet however, call it up as the language. When the spelling of "Chomura" is used, the results do talk of the people. The bottom line is: "What is the true origin of each word/name??"
I do hope that both of us will someday have more of our questions answered and some of our curiosities answered.

Good luck. Sally

Spelling error!

Posted: 25 Apr 2001 2:10PM GMT
Edited: 9 Jul 2001 6:27PM GMT
Sorry, my spelling of "Chomura" should read "Chamoru." Didn't really mean to clobber everything so badly.

Sally

The origin of the word Chamorro

Fred (View posts)
Posted: 25 Apr 2001 9:52PM GMT
The strongest defense to its origin is the obvious...one cannot find any evidence of its origin anywhere in the writings on the Marianas islands yet there are tremendous evidences of its prominance in Central America. One does not have to have a degree in Geography to safely assume that the route Magellan took to get to Guam in 1521 intelligently entertains the possibility of slaves, indios, and/or workers being picked up enroute ultimately ending up in Guam and the Philippines. Until historians come up with facts supporting the word's origin in Guam, I will maintain my position that it has its origin in Spain and no other place. In my research, I found the word to have existed in the Canary Islands outside the Straits of Gibralter. For the life of me, I cannot relocate that web site. Oh well...one day I will.

Chamorro

Posted: 26 Apr 2001 8:16AM GMT
Edited: 9 Jul 2001 6:27PM GMT
It's all very interesting, but have you ever laid the Spain connection aside and concentrated on the the origin of those native peoples that came to Guam 2000 years or so B.C.??

Origins

Fred (View posts)
Posted: 26 Apr 2001 9:27PM GMT
Sally,
How can anyone even attempt to track 2000 BC with a language that isn't a written-type? For one, a Spanish chronicler called the natives "indios" without a single mention of the word "Chamorro". It is absolutely more plausable to accept its origin to be in the 16th century (Magellan's time) than to accept a B.C. timeline. The irony is, the hieroglyphics found in the caves in Guam has not been interpreted. What I do not understand Sally, is the obviousness of the facts that we so easily want to discount to accept the unprovable.

Chamorro

Posted: 27 Apr 2001 7:48AM GMT
Edited: 9 Jul 2001 6:27PM GMT
Fred,

You don't have the proof either that Magellan brought the name to Guam. Tell me where that document exists, and then maybe I'll strive to believe!
You know, this is all very ridiculous - what difference does it make anyway?
Just what is your PURPOSE in making this determination? Are you in research? Are you living on Guam at the present? In what age group do you fall? I think I am correct in commenting that you were not born in the early 1900s. If so, then I apologize.
Hey, I'm not trying to pick a fight here. I just happen to be a 70 year-old native of Ohio who happened to marry a Guamanian some 42 years ago. I have neared the conclusion of my research on my own American families. Then proceeded to track my husband's families. In the process I became interested in learning more about the history of Guam, its legends, source of names, etc. Unfortunately the Internet does not have all the information. Regretfully, there are many articles about any one topic, and unfortunatelly many of those articles are of the copy-cat nature. This is also true in actual information concerning many of the much older ancestors, whether they be English, French, German or Guamanian. You can't "have your cake and eat it too!"

So for now, peace, please.
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